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The cheating scandal that will not go away resurfaces

The sheer magnitude and technical complexity of the historic hole-card cheating scandals at Absolute Poker and Ultimate Bet, and the impressive detective work carried out by players to expose it, make the subject one of abiding interest. It surfaced again over the weekend on a poker radio broadcast.

Poker News Daily reports that one of the parties identified by the Kahnawake Gaming Commission investigation into the 'Superuser' issue was interviewed recently on the "Cold Call Show" carried by DonkDown Radio in the United States.

However, the person interviewed as Travis Makar denied that he had been one of the fraudsters, or that he had ever worked for the companies involved.

That said, the report appears to indicate that for someone making such a denial, Makar has a surprisingly wide knowledge of the cheating debacle, asserting that:

  • Others involved in the conspiracy had escaped unpunished, and that those identified in the KGC enquiry were "just a fraction" of those really involved.
  • The takeover of the companies under the Cereus banner by Stuart Gordon's Blanca Games, Inc., was a sham.
  • That he has the location of certain 'missing' hand histories that could prove the full extent of the scandals.
  • That the $20 million stolen in the scandals was dispersed through a scheme that "traded (it) for other companies' money all the time."

However, he did not substantiate these claims.

Makar admitted that he had been friends with alleged ringleader Russ Hamilton, and claimed that Hamilton's involvement was "just the tip of the iceberg."

"They released that (which) they wanted to release," Makar told his interviewers on-air. "There were other scandals going on that (Ultimate Bet) wanted to cover up. There was so much other cheating going on that they didn't want out there. There are people that mostly did the scam that walked away clean from this. Their names were never mentioned and they never faced any charges."

"Hamilton's covering for people and I don't know why," Makar said. "I can't tell you why he won't come forward. Maybe he feels some kind of loyalty. I know those that walked away with the bulk of the money are still out there."

Makar revealed that he had owned a computer service business which carried out work for some of the biggest names in poker. That may or may not be the source of important information that he claimed he possessed in the form of documents, e-mails, computer records, and the fraudulent 'Superuser' computer program itself.

Encouragingly - players have long been calling for criminal measures to be instituted against those involved - he revealed that this information is currently under review by undisclosed authorities to determine whether criminal proceedings should ensue, despite the growing time-gap between the scandals and the current situation.

The KGC has in the past assured players that the information unearthed in its investigation has been referred to the appropriate authorities for consideration.

Source: InfoPowa News

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