uzxtober
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5 April 2019 - 7:17pm

Any cases of players taking legal actions against casinos?

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Have anyone took legal actions against unfair online casino decisions? And is it possible to seek justice in court if you are dealing with lets say Curacao operators? I'm not planning anything, but just curious. I came across the site that offers to return your money you lost at rogue casinos. They collect evidence from different players and then sue operators I guess. Does it work? Any success stories or failed attempts? Or this is just another way of scamming players?

Eljuno

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7 April 2019 - 3:43pm
#1

I have never filed a complaint or any legal action against a casino as luckily enough, only a few times my winnings were confiscated, and since the amounts weren't too big, I never tried to do anything about it. I think that if it's a large sum, I would fight for it, but other than that, I think it's just a waste of time with lots of headaches for most likely- not getting anything back. But that's just my 2 cents.

Eljuno

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8 April 2019 - 6:32pm
#2

Not any that I've been heard of anyway...and I guess that's one of the problems with the online play compared to the land based one....well at least sometimes.

If it's a rogue and illegal casino...that would be pointless anyway..and if it's about a licensed operator...most of the aspects of the play would be covered by their terms anyway.

You know there's a term in the court called "setting a precedent".. I don't think it's been created yet in the online casino play yet(I might be wrong about that) but most of the lawyers wouldn't have a clue about online gambling anyway...and I don't think the local gambling authorities(who granted the license to the opperator at first place) would cooperate you anyway...well at least not in my home country.

Another aspect of it is I guess is... it should be about a huge win..(probably won't worth the headache if it's about 500 or 1000$,)but let's say a tens of thousands or a potential Jackpot win being disputed although we know from here- CL, that there's been a few punters who've been cut off gaining theirs Jackpot wins and i didn't heard any of those being dragged to the courtroom.

So after saying all that (don't know if it's any true in it at all to be honest) I'd recommend you a guy... if you have any troubles of that kind in future..surely he's been helping a few(dozens!) of punters over the years cooperating between the casinos and the players..you know him...it's Ed...CL-Ed 😉

2 Eljuno, xtober

uzxtober
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9 April 2019 - 9:30am
#3
sharpe wrote:

there's been a few punters who've been cut off gaining theirs Jackpot wins and i didn't heard any of those being dragged to the courtroom.

Yeah, that's probably because they agree to some sort of secret deals. Accept a smaller share of their winnings. I've read about a few cases like that. Otherwise it would be worth hiring good lawyers.

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9 April 2019 - 1:37pm
#4

I think there's even been a couple of occasions(at least) when the punters who have hit the Jackpot weren't been compacted at all..think there was such example at Will Hill casino a few years back.

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10 April 2019 - 7:10am
#5

I

sharpe wrote:

I think there's even been a couple of occasions(at least) when the punters who have hit the Jackpot weren't been compacted at all..think there was such example at Will Hill casino a few years back.

I remember reading something about that, I believe you're right sharpe. I think it may have been right here at CL I came across that info. Plus this type of thread why wouldn't William Hill come up in conversation right from the start lol they are like the rebels in online gaming.

sharpe

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10 April 2019 - 10:45am
#6

Curacao gambling authority is not doing anything serious for players. They are just selling their licenses.
I doubt legal actions would work for rogue casinos.

UKGC, Isle of Man, Gibraltar, Malta are strict for player protection.

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10 April 2019 - 2:02pm
#7
WaroftheGods wrote:

I

I remember reading something about that, I believe you're right sharpe. I think it may have been right here at CL I came across that info. Plus this type of thread why wouldn't William Hill come up in conversation right from the start lol they are like the rebels in online gaming.

Yeah I'm aware of that of the CL -William Hill review page as well...I'd never think there's could be a problem of such matter when it's about a so famous brand...but I guess that's why CL could be so useful for the players.

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10 April 2019 - 2:45pm
#8

You most likely wouldn't have any luck going after a Curacao casino. As others have mentioned, the jurisdiction doesn't have any meaningful oversight over the casinos they license. You probably have better luck going after one if you were looking at a casino in a spot like Malta or the UK.

uzxtober
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10 April 2019 - 7:28pm
#9

Yeah, that's what I think as well. But I was surprised to see someone is actually offering help to collect money from rogue casinos. Guess that might be a scam.

uzxtober
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10 April 2019 - 7:34pm
#10
coolsongss wrote:

Curacao gambling authority is not doing anything serious for players. They are just selling their licenses.
I doubt legal actions would work for rogue casinos.

A few months ago I read that Curacao government acknowledged the problem and was willing to take the industry under control. But there seems to be no changes so far.

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11 April 2019 - 1:51am
#11

There have been cases filed by players against casinos on a range of different issues including payment disputes, lack of enforcement of self exclusion and/or responsible gambling policies, underage gambling etc, but the only ones I have seen are in regulated jurisdictions like the UK or New Jersey. I don't include Curacao in that list.

The problem with Curacao is not just that the authorities there don't care although that plays a huge part, it is that it can be very difficult to even identify who you are suing. The casinos are often deliberately set up using a shelf company in Curacao that is owned by another company in some other country where they are not forced to disclose the names of the directors, who have never even set foot on the island. So they are effectively anonymous. Often there is not even any money held in the Curacao company so there would be nothing to pay even if you won your case. So then you are talking about a multi-jurisdictional case involving hidden companies formed in tax havens in order to chase the money. It could take years to untangle all that, at enormous expense, with no guarantees you would be paid in the end. So for someone trying to get paid a few thousand bucks from a rogue casino, it isn't worth the time and effort. Sadly the casinos know this full well and are structured to exploit this situation.

As for anyone claiming they can get you paid by a rogue casino that is set up in a tax haven like Curacao through the legal system there, I'd love to think it was true by I am very dubious. How/why are they doing this? Are they asking for a percentage of the settlement amount or charging other fees? If you really wanted to go down that path knowing what I have said above you could always contact a Curacao lawyer directly, no need for an intermediary.

xtober

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11 April 2019 - 7:37am
#12
CL-Ed wrote:

How/why are they doing this? Are they asking for a percentage of the settlement amount or charging other fees?

They call it donation. 5% of the claim amount should be donated for them to consider your case. You are right, why would people need an intermediary.

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11 April 2019 - 11:17pm
#13

So its 5% up front? There can be no guarantee of success. If it was 5% on contingency (i.e. only charged if you win) then ok, but asking for the money up front sounds dubious to me. Of course there would be expenses involved, but again you would be better to go direct to a lawyer if you're going to be paying up front.

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12 April 2019 - 7:14am
#14
CL-Ed wrote:

So its 5% up front? There can be no guarantee of success. If it was 5% on contingency (i.e. only charged if you win) then ok, but asking for the money up front sounds dubious to me. Of course there would be expenses involved, but again you would be better to go direct to a lawyer if you're going to be paying up front.

Yes, 5% up front.

CL-Ed